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Plan for getting older

Ages 22-40

  • Start planning for how you can best use the adult health and social services available to you. It is important be prepared and plan ahead.

For parents and caregivers

  • As parents and caregivers of people with developmental disabilities age, your planning needs to change. Some issues that become more important as parents age include financial security and social supports for their loved one after parents/supporters pass away, as well as housing needs.

Suggested Resources

For parents and caregivers

Ages 41 and over

  • As you get older you may notice changes with your health and support needs. Make a plan ahead of time so that you can prepare for changes.
  • It is important to keep track of any changes in your health and support needs.
  • You can have someone help you keep track of your healthcare appointments and assessments.
  • One important thing that people with developmental disabilities should screen for is dementia.
  • You can have someone who cares for you start checking you when you turn 50 years old.
  • Depending on the developmental disability that you have you may need to start checking for signs of dementia when you turn 40 years old. One example is Down Syndrome.

For parents and caregivers

  • As parents and caregivers of people with developmental disabilities age, your planning needs to change. Some issues that become more important as parents age include financial security and social supports for their loved one after parents/supporters pass away, as well as housing needs.

Suggested Resources

For parents and caregivers 

Plan for adult services

Ages 15-17

  • Start planning for your transition into adult health and social services. It is important be prepared and plan ahead.

For you parents and caregivers 

  • As parents and caregivers of people with developmental disabilities age, your planning needs to change. Some issues that become more important as parents age include financial security and social supports for their loved one after parents/supporters pass away, as well as housing needs.

Suggested Resources

Resources for parents and caregivers 

Ages 18-21

  • Start planning for your transition into adult health and social services. It is important be prepared and plan ahead.

For your parents and caregivers

  • As you grow older, the planning needs for you and your child change. Some issues that become more important include financial security, housing security and social supports for your loved one after you are no longer able to support their needs.

Suggested Resources

For parents and caregivers

Find education after high school, if applicable

Ages 18-21

  • After high school some people start volunteering or working and other people stay in school and go to college.
  • Some college programs get you ready for different jobs and others can teach you life skills.
  • Your high school guidance counsellor can help you figure out which program might be best for you, or you can call colleges in your area to find out more.

Suggested Resources

Ages 22-40

  • After high school some people start volunteering or working and other people stay in school and go to college.
  • Some college programs get you ready for different jobs and others can teach you life skills.
  • Your high school guidance counsellor can help you figure out which program might be best for you, or you can call colleges in your area to find out more.

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Ages 41 and over

  • After high school some people start volunteering or working and other people stay in school and go to college.
  • Some college programs get you ready for different jobs and others can teach you life skills.
  • Your high school guidance counsellor can help you figure out which program might be best for you, or you can call colleges in your area to find out more.

Suggested Resources

Plan for life changes

Ages 18-21

  • Start planning for your transition into adult health and social services. It is important be prepared and plan ahead.

For parents and caregivers

  • As parents and caregivers of people with developmental disabilities age, your planning needs to change. Some issues that become more important as parents age include financial security and social supports for their loved one after parents/supporters pass away, as well as housing needs.

Suggested Resources

Resources for parents and caregivers

Ages 22-40

  • Start planning for how you can best use the adult health and social services available to you. It is important be prepared and plan ahead.

For your parent/caregiver

  • As you grow older, the planning needs for you and your child change. Some issues that become more important include financial security, housing security and social supports for your loved one after you are no longer able to provide these needs.

Resources for your parent/caregiver

Save for the future

Ages 15-17

  • Consider opening a Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP). A RDSP helps you save money faster through government contributions.
  • To be eligible for a RDSP you need to be eligible for and receiving the Disability Tax Credit.

Suggested Resources

Ages 18-21

  • Consider opening a Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP). A RDSP can help you save money faster through government contributions.
  • To be eligible for a RDSP you need to be eligible for and receiving the Disability Tax Credit.

Suggested Resources

Ages 22-40

  • Consider opening a Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP).
  • A RDSP can help you save money faster through government contributions.
  • To be eligible for a RDSP you need to be eligible for and receiving the Disability Tax Credit.

Suggested Resources

Ages 41 and over

  • Consider opening a Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP).
  • A RDSP can help you save money faster through government contributions.
  • To be eligible for a RDSP you need to be eligible for and receiving the Disability Tax Credit.

Suggested Resources

Open a bank account

Ages 15-17

  • Having a bank account is important for budgeting, paying bills and saving.
  • A chequing account is good for budgeting and paying bills and a savings account is good for putting money aside.
  • You can open a bank account for yourself. You can ask someone you trust to help you.
  • Some people might open a joint bank account with a parent or a legal guardian.
  • Any individual who is a member of the joint account can withdraw from the account and deposit to it.

Suggested Resources

Ages 18-21

  • Having a bank account is important for budgeting, paying bills and saving.
  • A chequing account is good for budgeting and paying bills and a savings account is good for putting money aside.
  • You can open a bank account for yourself. You can ask someone you trust to help you.
  • Some people might open a joint bank account with a parent or a legal guardian.
  • Any individual who is a member of the joint account can withdraw from the account and deposit to it.

Suggested Resources

Ages 22-40

  • Having a bank account is important for budgeting, paying bills and saving.
  • A chequing account is good for budgeting and paying bills and a savings account is good for putting money aside.
  • You can open a bank account for yourself. You can ask someone you trust to help you.
  • Some people might open a joint bank account with a parent or a legal guardian.
  • Any individual who is a member of the joint account can withdraw from the account and deposit to it.

Suggested Resources

Ages 41 and over

  • Having a bank account is important for budgeting, paying bills and saving.
  • A chequing account is good for budgeting and paying bills and a savings account is good for putting money aside.
  • You can open a bank account for yourself. You can ask someone you trust to help you.
  • Some people might open a joint bank account with a parent or a legal guardian.
  • Any individual who is a member of the joint account can withdraw from the account and deposit to it.

Suggested Resources

Learn about housing options

Ages 15-17

  • As you get older you may want more independence.
  • Part of being more independent is thinking about where you want to live and who you want to live with.
  • It is important to learn about different housing options that suit your needs.

Suggested Resources

Ages 18-21

  • As you get older you may want more independence.
  • Part of being more independent is thinking about where you want to live, and who you want to live with.
  • It is important to learn about different housing options that suit your needs.

Suggested Resources

Ages 22-40

  • As you get older you may want more independence.
  • Part of being more independent is thinking about where you want to live, and who you want to live with.
  • It is important to learn about different housing options that suit your needs.

Suggested Resources

Ages 41 and over

  • As you get older your needs may change in the home you live in.
  • You may need a home that is easy for you to get around in. This may be a home that does not have a lot of stairs or has a walk-in shower.
  • It is important to learn about different housing options that suit your needs.

Suggested Resources

Begin planning for transition into adult services

Ages 12-14

As your child ages, they will be expected to transition from children and youth health and social services to the adult health and community and social services system when they are 18 years old. Many supports and services look differently for adults, it is important to be prepared for this change.

Suggested Resources

Plan for high school

Ages 12-14

  • Planning ahead can help get your child and school prepared for this transition.
  • This is often called “Transition Planning.”

Suggested Resources

Capacity and consent

Ages 12-14

  • As children get older, they develop the ability to legally make decisions about important aspects in their lives around their health and finances.
  • Issues around capacity and consent are complicated.

Suggested Resources

Ages 15-17

  • Consent means giving your permission for something to happen.
  • By law, people must consent to decisions about their healthcare and finances.
  • You can get help from family, friends, or workers to help you make decisions.
  • Some people might not legally be able to give consent.
  • There is a legal process to determine if you cannot give consent.
  • If you are not legally able to provide consent on your own, it is important to know who can provide consent for you.

Suggested Resources

Ages 18-21

  • Consent means giving your permission for something to happen.
  • By law, people must consent to decisions about their healthcare and finances.
  • You can get help from family, friends, or workers to help you make decisions.
  • Some people might not legally be able to give consent.
  • There is a legal process to determine if you cannot give consent.
  • If you are not legally able to provide consent on your own, it is important to know who can provide consent for you.

Suggested Resources

Ages 22-40

  • Consent means giving your permission for something to happen.
  • By law, people must consent to decisions about their healthcare and finances.
  • You can get help from family, friends, or workers to help you make decisions.
  • Some people might not legally be able to give consent.
  • There is a legal process to determine if you cannot give consent.
  • If you are not legally able to provide consent on your own, it is important to know who can provide consent for you.

Suggested Resources

Ages 41 and over

  • Consent means giving your permission for something to happen.
  • By law, people must consent to decisions about their healthcare and finances.
  • You can get help from family, friends, or workers to help you make decisions.
  • Some people might not legally be able to give consent.
  • There is a legal process to determine if you cannot give consent.
  • If you are not legally able to provide consent on your own, it is important to know who can provide consent for you.

Suggested Resources

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